Download Our Free Report To See How 3D Printing Enhances Clinical Preparedness

Using Stratasys solutions, the Nicklaus Children’s Hospital created an anatomically precise 3D model of Mia’s heart, directly from her CT scan. With the model, Dr. Redmond Burke and his team were able to figure out which part of her arch should be divided to achieve the best physiological result.

Download Our Free Report To See How 3D Printing Enhances Clinical Preparedness.

Using Stratasys solutions, the Nicklaus Children’s Hospital created an anatomically precise 3D model of Mia’s heart, directly from her CT scan. With the model, Dr. Redmond Burke and his team were able to figure out which part of her arch should be divided to achieve the best physiological result.

Beyond what you may have heard on the news, 3D printing in hospitals is not new. A 2017 survey conducted by SME found that 69% of hospitals using 3D printing have been using it for 3 or more years. The majority of hospital applications are around anatomical models, device prototyping, and training.

Today 16 of the 20 top-ranked hospitals, according to U.S. News and World Report, now have a medical 3D print strategy. As the technology matures, more and more applications present themselves. Below are three of the biggest advancements we’ve seen implemented.

Centre for Biomedical and Technology Integration

3D Printing in Hospitals: The Top 3 Methods

1. Bio-Mechanical Accuracy

Surgical planning makes up 82% of how hospitals use anatomical models toady. New bio-mechanically accurate materials offer new uses for these planning models. Surgeons can now operate on patient-specific anatomy before ever stepping foot in the OR. This provides invaluable insights into procedure planning and potential complications. This provides newfound confidence in even the most complex operations.

2. Surgeon Training

Whether its a new device or procedure, how surgeons do their job is continuously changing. Currently, cadavers and silicone models make up the majority of simulations for training. With 3D printing material advancements, trainees can now work on specialized custom anatomy. This means no matter how rare a condition, 3D printing can provide a realistic procedure simulation.

3. Planning Tool Hospital Teams

Pre-Surgical planning is still the largest market for 3D printing in this space. OR Management News surveyed 100 hospitals and found that a minute in an OR will cost between $22 and $133. The average OR cost per minute came out to over $62. Traditional planning models allow teams of doctors to plan complex options before entering the OR. This means up to hours shaved off surgery times, saving the hospital thousands of dollars. Having a plan before entering an operation means less complication and better-informed consent.

See How 3D Printing Enhances Clinical Preparedness

FULL COLOR, TRANSPARENCY, FLEXIBILITY

One of the key elements to educating and training healthcare practitioners is understanding both normal and pathologic anatomy. In the real world, every patient’s anatomy is different, so a surgeon’s practice on human cadavers, animal models and generic mannequins often has little relevance to the actual patient on the table.

Download Case Study

See How 3D Printing Enhances Clinical Preparedness

FULL COLOR, TRANSPARENCY, FLEXIBILITY

One of the key elements to educating and training healthcare practitioners is understanding both normal and pathologic anatomy. In the real world, every patient’s anatomy is different, so a surgeon’s practice on human cadavers, animal models and generic mannequins often has little relevance to the actual patient on the table.

Download Case Study